Category Archives: Uncategorized

Episode 59. In Plain Sight: The Thing (1982)

John Carpenter’s terrifying cult classic stands the test of time in many regards – from the practical effects, to the performances to the storytelling, there’s little about the film that doesn’t work. Andrea and Alex tackle the film and its stances on leadership, paranoia, the notion of discovery, and more over a bottle of Jim Beam.

REQUIRED READING

The Thing. Dir. John Carpenter, 1982.

EXTRA CREDIT

Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from the 1890s to Present by Robin R. Means Coleman. An in-depth look at Black culture and representation through the lens of horror films.

Aids as Monster in Science Fiction by Edward Guerrero.

Filmnoia, or How Fear Permeated Cinema. George Wead’s history of perception and paranoia in North American films.

You Must Remember This podcast – the Blacklist series.

The Thing: Infection at Outpost 31 board game. Can you survive the infection?

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Episode 58. A Mind is a Terrible Thing to Waste: 2017 Year in Review

Come for the bloopers, stay for our favourite films of 2017, the A’s to your burning Q’s and the friendship challenge rematch!

EXTRA CREDIT

Salem Horror Fest! Thank you for having us!

 NPR’s Code Switch – a great episode on Black identity in horror and in Jordan Peele’s Get Out.

The Get Out Syllabus – From our friends at Graveyard Shift Sisters, all you could want to know and more about Get Out and more!

TIFF Long Takes : How Horror Slayed the Competition – Alex’s guest spot on the TIFF podcast.

CONTEST! Win a copy of issue #1 of GRIM MAGAZINE! To enter, tell us your favorite horror film of 2017 in the comments section below. Winners will be selected and notified February 15, 2018. [The winner has been selected and notified. Thanks to everyone who entered!]

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Episode 55. Strange and Unusual: Beetlejuice (1988)

Ghosts, possession, autonomous sculptures and that’s just scratching the surface of Tim Burton’s genre-bending cult classic, Beetlejuice. In this episode, Andrea and Alex manage to avoid saying his name three times while diving into the aesthetics, capitalist virtues and bureaucracy of the afterlife that surrounds everyone’s favourite bio-exorcist.

REQUIRED READING

Beetlejuice. Dir. Tim Burton, 1988.

EXTRA CREDIT

The Imagination of Tim Burton – An overview of Burton’s career through an aesthetic lens.

Michael Keaton on Creating Beetlejuice – The ghost with the most talks transformation.

Michael Keaton Beetlejuice Introduction – Keaton talks all things Beetlejuice before a screening.
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Episode 54. Undead Walking: Night of the Living Dead (1968), Dawn of the Dead (1978) and Day of the Dead (1985)

Alex and Andrea go back to the zombie’s origins with George A. Romero’s original Dead trilogy. From their social roots in Haiti to their ties to the New Hollywood movement, these films make delicious brain food.

REQUIRED READING

Night of the Living Dead. Dir. George A. Romero, 1968.
Dawn of the Dead. Dir. George A. Romero, 1978.
Day of the Dead. Dir. George A. Romero, 1985.

EXTRA CREDIT

When There’s No More Room in Hell: The Sociology of the Living Dead. Andrea’s book on Romero’s early Dead films.

Passage of Darkness: the Ethnobiology of the Haitian Zombie by Wade Davis. An interdisciplinary study on Haitian political life and folklore.

Marxism and Literature by Raymond Williams. Marxist concepts applied to literature that provided the bedrock for Williams’ theory of cultural materialism that Andrea holds dear.

The Reduction of Urban Vulnerability: Revisiting 1950s American Suburbanization as Civil Defence. Kathleen Tobin’s article on the military’s involvement in the rise of the suburbs.

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Alex’s 31 Days of Halloween Horror 2017 (October 16 – 31)

 

Alright, it’s mid-October. Are you tired yet? Thought not. Onwards!

October 16: Scream 2 (1997). Scream is a classic, but Scream 2 is a classic sequel. The original dynamics of my favourite Scooby gang (Sidney, Gale and Dewey) are at play and Wes Craven’s direction easily guides their story forward for a fun and violent late 90s romp. Also, Courteney Cox deserves all the praise for rocking those chunky highlights with minimal embarrassment.

October 17: The Omen (1976). It’s all for you Damien! Watch adults get whipped up into a tizzy over the son of the Devil that ends with one of cinema’s most chilling endings.

October 18: The Eyes of My Mother (2016) I want to talk about this movie to EVERYONE! But the less you know going into it, the better. So all I will say is, give it a watch.

October 19: I Am Not a Serial Killer (2016) Another recent film I’m shocked I haven’t heard more people talk about. I Am Not a Serial Killer is beautiful, gruesomely nostalgic and chilling, highly recommended. Again, the less you know going in – the better.

October 20: The Hills Have Eyes (2006) I prefer Aja’s remake for its visceral, unflinching violence that escalates in every screen. Aja and his team created images that are still seared in my brain.

October 21: The Strangers (2008) Quiet terror perfected, crush on Scott Speedman confirmed.

October 22: Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace (2004) A Faculty of Horror listener turned me on to this series (thanks Allen!) and since it’s all on YouTube you don’t have an excuse not to watch this joyfully bonkers cult-British series.

October 23: The House on Haunted Hill (1959) Speaking of joyfully bonkers, have you accepted our Lord and Saviour Vincent Price?

October 24: Under the Shadow (2016) I wanted desperately to love The Babadook, thankfully there’s Under the Shadow which is everything I wanted for my parent/child terror dynamic.

October 25: Cat People (1942) Classics are classics for a reason. Jacques Tourneur’s film holds up with elements of campy horror and female psychological dread. The film has gone on to influence a litter of other films because of its beautiful and stylistic simplicity. If you’re interested, here’s a longer piece I wrote about the film.

October 26: The Fog (1980) The film responsible for my lifelong dream of owning a lighthouse.

October 27: Prevenge (2016) Part horror comedy, part gore-stravaganza, part meditation on impending motherhood, all awesome.

October 28: Orphan (2009). One of the great contemporary camp classics held up with great performances all around.

October 29: Beware the Slenderman (2016). Sorry, were we having too much fun? Check out HBO’s documentary which examines the sociology of internet phenomenons and a chilling true crime case.

October 30: Black Swan (2010). I love Vincent Cassel. It also captures the competitive mania that artistic communities can breed with horrific accuracy.

October 31: Halloween 3: Season of the Witch (1982). Happy, happy Halloween, Halloween, Halloween. Happy, happy Halloween, Halloween, Halloween, SILVER SHAMROCK!

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Episode 53. Boxed In: Cube (1997)

Andrea and Alex tackle the mysterious and ever changing narrative landscape of Vincenzo Natali’s Canadian cult film, Cube (1997). From workers rights to torture porn to prime numbers, they try to solve it all before they succumb to the film’s traps and trappings.

Tickets for our first-ever live show in Salem, MA are available now: buy them here!

Be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to keep up to date on all our announcements.

REQUIRED READING

Cube. Dir. Vincenzo Natali, 1997.

EXTRA CREDIT

Vincenzo Natali interview. Conducted during press for Natali’s later film, Splice, this interview tackles elements of Cube and Natali’s own ideology.

Rue Morgue Library’s Horrorwood North is out of print, but you can buy the digital version here.

The 1990s Teen Horror Cycle – Alex’s new book is now available for pre-order!
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